Friday, December 2, 2016

Learning about Troon Vineyard & Oregon's Applegate Valley on #Winestudio

The Willamette Valley and it's sub-regions seems to receive the bulk of attention when discussing Oregon wine, but after this month's #WineStudio, southern Oregon should receive equal treatment. Specifically, I am referring to the Applegate Valley AVA where Troon Vineyard is one of eighteen wineries operating in this sub-AVA within the Rogue Valley AVA.

Located approximately 50 miles from the California border and 90 miles from the Pacific, the Applegate Valley possesses a moderate climate. It is enclosed by the Siskiyou Mountains with an opening to the Pacific that provides cooling breezes and a large diurnal shift (50 degrees or more). Soils are predominately granite - similar to Beaujolais, Alsace and the Languedoc. And because of several diverse micro-climates there are over 70 grape varieties planted -- many originating from southern France and the Italian coasts and islands.



Modern viticulture didn't return to the Applegate Valley until 1972 when Dick Troon planted his vineyard and Frank Wisnovsky planted grapes while restoring Valley View Winery. (Valley View was one of the first wineries in Oregon -- opening in 1854.)  After starting Troon Vineyard in 1972,  Dick Troon eventually sold the property to the Martin family who are still the proprietors. Recently they hired wine expert, social media maverick, and talented blogger Craig Camp as their General Manager. During November's #WineStudio, Craig virtually walked us through the Applegate Valley, Troon's vineyards, and the wine-making philosophy of Steve Hall.

According to Craig, "winemaking at Troon is straightforward". The grapes are harvested and field sorted by a full time vineyard crew. All grapes are then crushed by foot and fermented outside by natural indigenous yeasts with only hand punch downs. Apparently foot crushing is actually gentler than a press. Whites see an additional natural fermentation in mature French Oak. And Camp emphasized that "there are no acids, sugar or enzymes added to any of the wines".  The results are impressive based on the three wines we sampled.


2014 Troon Black Label Vermentino, Applegate Valley ($29)  Rests on its lees for 12 months in oak and co-fermented with 4.5% Early Muscat. Enhanced aromatics and texture are readily apparent from this approach. There is also a noticeable saline or mineral character and bitter almonds.  Finishes with refreshing acids. Very nicely done.

2014 Troon Blue Label Sangiovese, Rogue Valley ($29) Co-fermented with 8% Syrah and the anti-Super Tuscan. The wine is light bodied, but complex and flavorful body staring with red cherries and transitioning to bacon. Yes, bacon; although that sensation mellowed over time. The subtle tannins contribute to a very smooth finish.

2014 Troon Black Label M*T, Applegate Valley ($50) Co-fermented Malbec 40% and Tannat 60% that is a similar blend to some Cahors and Madiran wines. Craig believes that the structure enhancing Tannat may be the premier grape variety in the valley whereas the Malbec provides velvety qualities. Tannat usually imparts aggressive tannins, but these are muted both by the Malbec and the granite soils that encourage more rounded tannins.  This wine is a home run. Dense black fruit, structure and smooth but noticeable tannins.
Post a Comment